Did the Sabbath Day Change to Sunday in the New Covenant?

In the first part of this series we examined Scripture that referenced the "first day of the week" to see if the Sabbath day was changed to Sunday in the New Covenant.  In the second part of the series we examined Scripture that referenced the "day of the Lord" or "the Lord's day".  In this third part of the series we will consider a few other points to discover the answer.

Did the Sabbath Day Change to Sunday in the New Covenant?  Part 2

In the first part of this series we examined passages from Scripture that spoke of the apostles meeting on "the first day of the week".  In this second portion we will examine Scriptural references to the "day of the Lord" to see if the Sabbath day was changed in the New Covenant.

Acts 2

Acts 2:20 is the first reference in the writings of the Apostles to "the day of the Lord".  The particular "day of the Lord" noted in this passage mentions that the sun will be turned to darkness and the moon will be turned into blood before the "great and glorious day of the Lord shall come".  This passage clearly references "the last days" (verse 17) and is not speaking of any weekly event nor does it make any mention of the Sabbath.

In a previous article we discovered the myth that Sabbath observance has been abolished does not match the testimony of Scripture.

In this series we will examine the question "Did the Sabbath Day Change to Sunday in the New Covenant?"  I know the opinion of some is "yes!" and the opinion of others is "no!"  Let's examine Scripture and see what it has to say on the matter:

The first verse of Scripture that uses the Hebrew word for Sabbath (shabbat) is found in Genesis 2:2-3.  This passage tells us that G-d sanctified the seventh day... what we know as Saturday.

In the first article of this two-part series on Debunking the Myths of Christmas we addressed the origins of Christmas itself.  This second article is dedicated to examining the origins of many of the traditional trappings of Christmas.

Part 2: Where do the traditional trappings of Christmas come from?

Christmas trees

Tree worship was common among the pagan Europeans and survived their conversion  to Christianity in the Scandinavian customs of decorating the house and barn  with evergreens at the New Year to scare away the devil and of setting up a tree  for the birds during Christmastime; it survived further in the custom, also  observed in Germany, of placing a Yule tree at an entrance or inside the house  during the midwinter holidays.

Encyclopedia Brittanica on Christmas trees

Realizing that this may be a sensitive subject for some who are just beginning their Torah walk, Christmas is the next topic that is examined in the In Support of Torah Observance- Debunking the Myths series.  Christmas will be examined in two parts:

Part 1: What does Scripture and history say about Christmas? Part 2: Where do the traditional trappings of Christmas come from?

Part 1: What does Scripture and history say about Christmas?

Scripture

If  we search the whole of Scripture in English or the original languages we find no mention of "Christmas".  While the birth of Messiah is definitely described in Scripture, it is recorded in only one place: Luke 2:1-7.  Examining these verses we find that there is no mention of "Christmas", trees, holly, yule logs, gifts, tinsel, wreaths, Santa Claus, or reindeer.  Where did the traditional Christmas come from?

The previous article of this series addressed common myths regarding Sabbath observance for believers.  This article will focus on addressing common myths Christians have about food.

God never changes

First we should note that G-d does not change.  Ever.

For I, the LORD, do not change; therefore you, O sons of Jacob, are not consumed. - Malachi 3:6

Every good thing given and every perfect gift is from above, coming down from the Father of lights, with whom there is no variation or shifting shadow. - James 1:17

 

The first article of this series provided some reasons for observing Torah.  First and foremost among them was the reason that Messiah Yeshua was Torah-observant and as his disciples we, too, should follow Torah.

This second article (and subsequent articles) in the series intends to address the myths  and misinterpretations of Scripture that might confuse believers seeking the Truth of G-d's Word.  Yeshua is "the Way, the Truth, and the Life" (John 14:6) so when we seek the Truth, we seek Him... in all His Torah-observant glory and holiness.

Myth #1: Paul tells believers to disregard the Sabbath.

Torah Portion

חקת (Chukat)

 

 

or view this week's triennial cycle reading.

Today is

Yom Chamishi, 8 Tammuz, 5778

Thursday, June 21, 2018

 

Learn more about this date in history.